One Auspicious Night.

Let not a person revive the past
Or on the future build her hopes
For the past has been left behind
and the future has not been reached.
Instead with insight let her see
Each presently arisen state,
Let her know that & be sure of it,
Invincibly & unshakeably.
Today the effort must be made:
Tomorrow death may come, who knows?
No bargain with Mortality.
Can keep him & his hordes away.
But one who dwells thus ardently,
Relentlessly, by day & night –
It is she – the Peaceful Sage has said,
Who has had a single excellent night.
153_out-1.jpg
~ MN 131~ Bhaddekaratta Sutta.
Middle Length Discourse of the Buddha
One Auspicious Night Discourse
Tweaked Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Wisdom Publications 1995
Boston, USA
Page 1039.
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I dance with my heart ~ Alonzo King

A Lemon by Pablo Neruda

LEMON WATERCOLOUR

Out of lemon flowers
loosed
on the moonlight, love’s
lashed and insatiable
essences,
sodden with fragrance,
the lemon tree’s yellow
emerges,
the lemons
move down
from the tree’s planetarium

Delicate merchandise!
The harbors are big with it-
bazaars
for the light and the
barbarous gold.
We open
the halves
of a miracle,
and a clotting of acids
brims
into the starry
divisions:
creation’s
original juices,
irreducible, changeless,
alive:
so the freshness lives on
in a lemon,
in the sweet-smelling house of the rind,
the proportions, arcane and acerb.

Cutting the lemon
the knife
leaves a little cathedral:
alcoves unguessed by the eye
that open acidulous glass
to the light; topazes
riding the droplets,
altars,
aromatic facades.

So, while the hand
holds the cut of the lemon,
half a world
on a trencher,
the gold of the universe
wells
to your touch:
a cup yellow
with miracles,
a breast and a nipple
perfuming the earth;
a flashing made fruitage,
the diminutive fire of a planet. 

~ by Pablo Neruda

 

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver

Wild+Geese+-+Mary+Oliver

 

The barn burnt down…along the roadside…blossoming wild roses…

Attachment-1
by Mizuta Masahide
wild-rose-horse-1024x768
by Bashō

Plotinus on sculpting the self.

In Enneads I 6, 9, Plotinus writes,

Go back inside yourself and look: if you do not yet see yourself as beautiful [i.e., as participating in the Idea of Beauty], then do as the sculptor does with a statue he wants to make beautiful; he chisels away one part, and levels off another, makes one spot smooth and another clear, until he shows forth a beautiful face on the statue. Like him, remove what is superfluous, straighten what is crooked, clean up what is dark and make it bright, and never stop sculpting your own statue, until the godlike splendor of virtue shines forth to you…. If you have become this, and seen it, and become pure and alone with yourself, with nothing now preventing you from becoming one in this way, and have nothing extraneous mixed with your self… if you see that this is what you have become, then you have become a vision.

She let go

she let go by rev safire rose